Art

20 A’ Design Award Winning Works That Inspire With Visions Of A Creative Future

The A’ Design Award & Competition, one of the most prestigious international juried design awards, aims to highlight the world’s best designers in a variety of creative fields. In each edition of the awards, entries are peer-reviewed and anonymously judged by a jury of influential academics, press members, and industry professionals.

Laureates will enjoy international recognition for their work, including promotion of their awarded design to thousands of publications worldwide, media appearances with press partners, and inclusion in the famed World Design Rankings.

The coveted A’ Design Prize also comes with a trophy, a framed design excellence certificate, an annual yearbook, a special 3D-printed metal award trophy with a luxury box, the license to use the “A’ Design Award Winner Logo,” and an invitation to the exclusive gala-night in Italy.

Over the course of the awards’ storied history, winning designers have received over 2,500,00,000 impressions on television, in newspapers, and digital publications. With over 35,237 submissions and 156,647 registrations, countless participants have submitted their best designs, hoping to join the ranks of the current 14,556 award winners.

Now, you have a chance to showcase your talent, too. The registration is open for the A’ Design Award & Competition 2021 – 2022. Sign up here to submit your work, and stand a chance to be grouped with the world’s best creatives.

Wandering in the Woods Kindergarten
by L and M Design Lab

“The design creates an atrium based on original structure and brings an experience of wandering in the woods. Columns and beams immediately become trees and bridges,” said the team.

“Continuous stairs and slides spiral up around the ‘trees’, connecting and activating spaces. ‘Tree houses’ provide private spaces for children to read and do handwork.”


Wandering in the Woods Kindergarten by L and M Design Lab


Wandering in the Woods Kindergarten by L and M Design Lab


Wandering in the Woods Kindergarten by L and M Design Lab

Mminni Alcoholic Beverage Packaging
by Wen Liu, Qiumin Chen, and Weijie Kang

Wanting to create a “trendy consumption experience” for young people, designers Wen Liu, Qiumin Chen, and Weijie Kang designed the alcoholic beverage packaging “to be close to them and integrate into their lives.”

The ‘X’ on the design reflects the “unknown, infinite possibilities, goals and hopes in design, which represents the fearless exploration spirit of young people.” In order to rid consumers of the traditional idea of brandy, the designers sought to “produce a unique brand recognition,” using “unknown” and “color” to appeal to their target audience.


Mminni Alcoholic Beverage Packaging by Wen Liu, Qiumin Chen and Weijie Kang


Mminni Alcoholic Beverage Packaging by Wen Liu, Qiumin Chen and Weijie Kang


Mminni Alcoholic Beverage Packaging by Wen Liu, Qiumin Chen and Weijie Kang

Cloud
by Shota Urasaki

“I think there are many people who have imagined when they were children that they could sit on clouds. I realized that imagination,” said designer Shota Urasaki.

Inspired by a moving cloud while it rained on the coast of Okinawa Island in Japan, she felt that “poetic products enrich the emotions of users.” Additionally, the high seat gives the seated person a sense they are floating, while making the “surrounding space visually enjoyable” with its playful look.


Cloud by Shota Urasaki


Cloud by Shota Urasaki


Cloud by Shota Urasaki

The Growth Curve Deformable Clothing
by Haiwei Wang

Fashion designer Haiwei Wang was inspired by the futuristic design of 3D modeling technology. Fishbone is used as the garment’s supportive frame, with elastic fabric wrapped around it to shape the organic form. “This work makes the garment structure show 3D structure like [a] ‘soft sculpture’, light and breathable,” shares Wang.

“It is like [an] ergonomic extension design, flexible and changeable modeling gives clothing more possibilities, and [the] flowing shape brings people sensory stimulation,” he added.


The Growth Curve Deformable Clothing by Haiwei Wang


The Growth Curve Deformable Clothing by Haiwei Wang


The Growth Curve Deformable Clothing by Haiwei Wang

Awanama Sake – Japanese Rice Wine
by Ryuta Ishikawa

The bottle’s unique patterns were inspired by “Japanese cut glass,” said designer Ryuta Ishikawa. “The symbolic letter on the bottle, which stands out like a crest, is comprised of a Japanese word which means ‘raw’.”

While unpasteurized sake isn’t widely known globally, the design of this sake bottle hopes to “deliver the authentic savor of sake to the rest of the world in a completely new style. The design is aimed at putting this new brand into a different genre from Japanese sake,” he explained.


Awanama Sake – Japanese Rice Wine by Ryuta Ishikawa


Awanama Sake – Japanese Rice Wine by Ryuta Ishikawa


Awanama Sake – Japanese Rice Wine by Ryuta Ishikawa

Samsung Bot Chef Robotic Arm
by Think Tank Team

“Bot Chef was inspired by our love of cooking, and the desire to make meal preparation a more enjoyable and rewarding experience for both home cooks and professional chefs. Kitchen work and food preparation involves several tedious, time-consuming and repetitive tasks, and everyone could use an ‘extra hand’ in the kitchen,” said the team.

The innovative design incorporates cutting-edge hardware and software in robotics and automation in “an aesthetically pleasing and user-friendly form-factor.”


Samsung Bot Chef Robotic Arm by Think Tank Team


Samsung Bot Chef Robotic Arm by Think Tank Team


Samsung Bot Chef Robotic Arm by Think Tank Team

Madame Butterfly Posters
by Liudmila Shurygina

The posters’ vibrant designs were inspired by “the portraits of Malevich due to the minimalist iconic shapes, and the painting of Munch The Scream due to the open emotional expression. Also a big source of inspiration was Memphis style – open colors, contrast, simple shapes,” shares designer Liudmila Shurygina.

The designs also wanted to highlight the “tragic and dependent role of a woman in libretto of such operas such as Madame Butterfly, Tosca, or Norma in the form of iconic interpretation. On all posters, the composition represents the final scene – the culmination moment of the opera story,” she quipped.


Madame Butterfly Posters by Liudmila Shurygina


Madame Butterfly Posters by Liudmila Shurygina


Madame Butterfly Posters by Liudmila Shurygina

Create Your Own Moon Moon Cake
by Lam Cheung and Yi Lau

Gifting mooncakes is a common practice during the Mid-Autumn Festival in Hong Kong, so much so that the designers felt “the true meaning was maybe lost within the excessiveness.” Wanting to “re-engage people in communicating with their family,” the design allows the user to “create a miniature moon with his/her beloved ones, to share the sweetness of reunion time together implicitly.”

“Through this collaborative process, it adds a new dimension and motive to the traditional activities of the festival,” said designers Lam Cheung and Yi Lau.


Create Your Own Moon Moon Cake by Lam Cheung and Yi Lau


Create Your Own Moon Moon Cake by Lam Cheung and Yi Lau


Create Your Own Moon Moon Cake by Lam Cheung and Yi Lau

Hill Wind Hotel and Resort
by Huafang Wang

Combining the “local culture and historical context in the process of conception,” architect Huafang Wang used “the language of design to create dialogue with space, and then interpreted the visual, tactile, and spiritual resonance, reproducing the Anji area humanistic landscape pattern.”

The architect explained he “extracted the image of geometric clouds from the origami concept and extended the irregular shapes.” Using the same white film as the famed Burj Al Arab, the “two elements are integrated through structural changes, which bring out the best in each other,” he said.


Hill Wind Hotel and Resort by Huafang Wang


Hill Wind Hotel and Resort by Huafang Wang


Hill Wind Hotel and Resort by Huafang Wang

Orinigiri Package Design
by Tomoo Nitta

A creative cross between Origami and Onigiri, the food art combines rice balls with folding paper. “‘Origami’ is a traditional play that is handed down from generation to generation. ‘Onigiri’ is a food that delivers the warmth of people molding a handful of rice. Both fell in love and ‘ORINIGIRI’ has been born,” said designer Tom Nitta.

“By embracing the concept of ‘Origami’ squeezing ‘Onigiri’, ‘ORINIGIRI’ conveys people’s playful sense and warmth towards the future.”


Orinigiri Package Design by Tomoo Nitta


Orinigiri Package Design by Tomoo Nitta


Orinigiri Package Design by Tomoo Nitta

Neko Goten Cat Tower
by Hitomi Otake

Designed especially for cats, the Neko Goten Cat Tower is a “luxurious cat tower that your cat can play with safely. It has been designed with a comfortable environment for cats to live in, and the look and feel of the interior and the gravity of the interior are carefully considered to please the cat as well as the owner,” designer Hitomi Otake explained.


Neko Goten Cat Tower by Hitomi Otake


Neko Goten Cat Tower by Hitomi Otake


Neko Goten Cat Tower by Hitomi Otake

Sense Move Costume
by Zhulin Shi

With the initial concept of “geometrical folding following along with the kinetic movement of the body,” fashion designer Zhulin Shi used different lights to express each costume’s “emotions.”

“It not only presents dynamic forms like a kinetic 3D sculpture, but also enables musicians and performers to improve their performance and enhance people’s experience,” she explained, saying the design will help expand “the boundaries of the performance industry.”


Sense Move Costume by Zhulin Shi


Sense Move Costume by Zhulin Shi


Sense Move Costume by Zhulin Shi

GrowForest Educational Learning Toy
by Peishan Cai, Wanling Gao and Haochun Hu

In response to the crisis global forests are facing from climate change and deforestation, designers Peishan Cai, Wanling Gao and Haochun Hu developed “a set of educational learning toys to enhance children’s consciousness on the protection, conservation, and restoration of the forestry and terrestrial ecology.”

The toy set used “Taiwan domestic woods of acacia, incense cedar, Tochigi, Taiwan fir, camphor tree, and Asian fir” to make up the models. “Children can feel the warm touch of [the] wooden texture and smell the unique scent of each tree species,” the group explained.


GrowForest Educational Learning Toy by Peishan Cai, Wanling Gao and Haochun Hu


GrowForest Educational Learning Toy by Peishan Cai, Wanling Gao and Haochun Hu


GrowForest Educational Learning Toy by Peishan Cai, Wanling Gao and Haochun Hu

Maze and Cube Educational Toy
by Yang Yang Tu

Maze&Cube brings additional challenge to play, combining a “3D maze with [a] third-order Rubik’s cube.” With three different ways to complete the game, the “toy provides a motivation for the development of [the] right brain and memory ability. It can train children’s eye-hand coordination and space thought,” said designer Yang Yang Tu.


Maze and Cube Educational Toy by Yang Yang Tu


Maze and Cube Educational Toy by Yang Yang Tu


Maze and Cube Educational Toy by Yang Yang Tu

Island Glass
by Dohwa

Meant to resemble an island when turned upside down, the glass was inspired by “the Korean islands, Dokdo and Ulleungdo,” and distinguishes itself from the “existing uniform shape of the soju glass.”

The shape of the glass was “formed according to the island name, so you can enjoy different forms depending on the angle,” designer Dohwa detailed. “If you tilt your head to drink the wine in the glass, the person sitting on the other side can see the letters at the bottom of the glass.”


Island Glass by Dohwa


Island Glass by Dohwa


Island Glass by Dohwa

Origami Mask Fashion Mask
by Yuriko Wada

In an era of the pandemic when masks have become ubiquitous, designer Yuriko Wada wanted to create one that was “suitable for special occasions.” The design was “inspired by the traditional origami technique of folding a single sheet of paper and the functionality of washi paper, with its texture and breathability,” she explained.

“This origami mask is a project that combines two traditional elements that are familiar to Japanese people: washi and origami.”


Origami Mask Fashion Mask by Yuriko Wada


Origami Mask Fashion Mask by Yuriko Wada


Origami Mask Fashion Mask by Yuriko Wada

Phuket VIP Mercury Studio Office
by Songhuan Wu

Located in Phuket, the design “explores how to let the visual space meet aesthetic and practicality,” while building a closer relationship between “the whole space and original surrounding environment,” explained commercial space designer Songhuan Wu.

The design was inspired by the designer’s “hobby of cosmic astronomy,” seen in how he integrated “the aesthetics of the planet into the interior space design, which made the project use a large number of circular elements and arcs.”


Phuket VIP Mercury Studio Office by Songhuan Wu


Phuket VIP Mercury Studio Office by Songhuan Wu


Phuket VIP Mercury Studio Office by Songhuan Wu

Fineland Heshan Community Center Recreation
by Fineland Architecture and Studio Revo

The team based the community center’s design on elements of traditional Chinese handheld fans. “An abstract interpretation of fan leaves defines the background of the lobby,” said the team, with the hallway “also shaped by an abstraction of disassembled fan leaves that allow natural light in and create vivid spatial changes.”

Its entrance is a sight to behold, featuring a “revolving door [that] welcomes guests” with “paintings of ancient trees found in traditional Chinese culture on every door page.”


Fineland Heshan Community Center Recreation by Fineland Architecture and Studio Revo


Fineland Heshan Community Center Recreation by Fineland Architecture and Studio Revo


Fineland Heshan Community Center Recreation by Fineland Architecture and Studio Revo

Minimal Techno Arm Chair
by Sebastiaan Van Beest

Drawing inspiration from Japanese minimalism and the use of negative space, furniture designer Sebastiaan Van Beest said the design is a “prototype arm chair which is constructed from recycled solid steel and repurposed bamboo hardwood flooring.”

“The design is meant to feel delicate, yet strong and robust. Because of the thin steel and bamboo, this design has amazing flexibility and is quite comfortable to sit in for long periods of time,” he explained.


Minimal Techno Arm Chair by Sebastiaan Van Beest


Minimal Techno Arm Chair by Sebastiaan Van Beest


Minimal Techno Arm Chair by Sebastiaan Van Beest

Musical Vase
by Leijing Zhou and Ying Zhou

The Musical Vase is a multi-functional vase that plays music, bringing its users “both hearing and [visual] enjoyment.” The two designers said the “white is used to set off the natural beauty of plants,” with “the minimalist Zen shape [allowing] the sound to spread to the depths of people’s hearts, and the hollowed out part of the shape [bringing] more imagination.”

The Bluetooth music player “attempts to establish a dialogue between human and nature by integrating with the vase, bringing a multi-sensory experience to people,” they detailed.


Musical Vase by Leijing Zhou and Ying Zhou


Musical Vase by Leijing Zhou and Ying Zhou


Musical Vase by Leijing Zhou and Ying Zhou

Did these incredible designs catch your eye? Think your works could join the designs featured in the 2021 – 2022 edition of the A’ Design Award? Register your interest here, and you may just be featured on the next best projects list once the results are announced.

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